The Beacon News

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May 22, 2019

Area farmers set back by chilly temps, but say moisture is always welcome

Area farmers set back by chilly temps, but say moisture is always welcome

By Diane Newberry

This chilly, wet spring might not seem ideal to residents in town looking forward to summer activities, but farmers aren’t too displeased.
While they were delayed in planting because of cool conditions, Bruce Voegele, a farmer who lives just outside of Beulah, said area farmers were “making dust” when they could, and he and his wife Melissa aren’t overly concerned yet.
According to Bruce and Melissa, they’d rather be slightly delayed in planting than worrying about soil moisture content in the long run. The Voegeles, who grow corn, wheat and alfalfa, said moisture is one of their top concerns because they have been burned before by drought conditions.
“The eastern part of the state really doesn’t know what crop failure is,” Melissa said.
Craig Askim, an NDSU Extension agent, said that farmers in the region started planting, on average, about ten days behind where they would like to be. Particularly impacted, he said, are corn and soybean growers because those crops are susceptible to frost.

 


 
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